Logitech MX Keys keyboard Review

Hi,

I’m a software developer and to do my job I have to sit on the computer at least 8 hours daily. Having a decent, comfortable, and robust keyboard to do my job is a requirement. My previous keyboard was a Razer BlackWidow V3. I’ve used it as my daily driver for gaming and programming, but since I started recording videos the keyboard’s clicking sound was a problem and I had to replace it. (I think I’ve also heard my neighbor once complain about it πŸ˜…)

I’ve stumbled upon a Logitech MX Keys keyboard.

Here’s what I like about it:

  • It’s nice to type on. The experience is like ThinkPad keyboards. It feels nice, unique, and premium.
  • It has a white backlight that turns on when you hit a key or when it detects motion near the keyboard.
  • It’s silent, like a laptop keyboard.
  • It is wireless.
  • It works well on Linux and on Windows, macOS too.
  • It has lots of media control keys, they can be re-mapped using Logitech Options software.
  • Battery is good. It lasts about a week of daily use with backlight on.

And now, here’s what I don’t like about it:

  • You can’t use it in wired mode, it only supports wireless.
  • Backlight settings reset when the unifying receiver loses power. (At the time of editing this post, this problem went away by itself)

That’s about it. Overall, I like it and I will stick with it.

I don’t regret getting the version with the numpad since I don’t think I’m going to take it away from my desk, there’s a mini version that is more portable, if you’re interested.

Thanks for taking your time to read though this post. 🍻

*This post is not sponsored

Practical Binary Analysis | No Starch Press

I started reading this book in november and it took me about two weeks to finish it. You should be a bit comfortable Linux and programming if you plan to give it a try. Here are my thoughts about it.

What I like the most about this book is that it explains the subject in a straightforward and concise way! The author is a very knowledgeable security researcher and his work is state of the art! 

The book helped me fill a lot of gaps about how binary analysis is done, code obfuscation, linear disassemblers, recursive disassemblers, intermediate languages and lots of tools and libraries. It also helped me learn things that I didn’t know they exist, like: code injection, binary instrumentation, dynamic taint analysis and symbolic execution analysis.

Each chapter sets the foundation for the next one and at the end of each chapter you’re invited to solve the exercises which help you enforce and understand the information. The code and examples can be found on the book’s website.

There weren’t many books that I’ve found the appendixes very useful. This one is an exception! There’s one appendix that guides you on further reading and one that discusses the disassemblers and tools used in the book. Being a novice in the field I just love when I get recommendation from an expert like Dennis Andriesse.

I enjoyed the book a lot and I hope you will too! πŸ™‚